GrainsCooking Whole Grains  

- Beans and Lentils - Rice - Vegetarian - Grains - - Healthy - Soups - Reference - Equipment - Lee's Recipes -
- Part 1 "Whole Grains" types and storage - - Part 2 "Cooking Whole Grains" includes time charts - - Part 3 "Recipes for Whole Grains" includes links -

Methods

Whole grains can be steamed, simmered or pressure cooked. Dr. Gabe Mirkin recommends steaming and stove top. You do not need to rinse or presoak whole grains. The first time you cook a new grain, check them 5-10 minutes before the end of the cooking time to make sure they are not getting mushy. If they aren't tender enough to suit you at the end of the recommended time, cook a little longer. You can cook whole grains in plain water, but using bouillon or other flavored liquids gives them a flavor boost. You can use bouillon cubes, granules, liquid or paste; make up the required amount of liquid following the directions on your brand of bouillon. Grains cooked in vegetable or chicken flavored bouillon will have a neutral flavor that can be used for any purpose: breakfast cereal, main dishes, salads or desserts. Whole grains cooked without salt taste flat. If you want to keep to a low-sodium diet, flavor grains with herbs, spices, pestos.

Steaming Whole Grains

- Steaming Grains - - Stove Top Grains - - Pressure Cooking Grains - - Whole Grains - - Vegetarian - - Top - Lee's Recipes -

According to Dr. Gabe Mirkin an electric countertop steamer is the easiest, most convenient way to cook all of the whole grains. Her recommends one with at least an 8-cup capacity rice bucket and 75-minute timer. Countertop steamers come with instruction booklets with detailed information for cooking vegetables and seafood. Follow these instructions for cooking whole grains, using the times and amounts shown in the chart.Fill the steamer base with water to the top line. (Do not use the drip tray.) Place the steamer basket on the base. Place the grains and bouillon (use amounts from the chart) in the rice bowl and set the rice bowl in the steamer basket. Cover, plug in, and set the timer. Let the grains sit for at least 20-30 minutes after the timer rings before removing the lid.You can let them sit for several hours if you prefer. This way you can let them cook while you sleep or go to work. Drain the grains in a colander if there is excess liquid.
For 2 1/2 cups (1 pound) Grains
Amount of Bouillon or Water
Cooking Time
Wheat Berries
4 cups
75 Minutes
Kamut
4 cups
75 Minutes
Spelt
4 cups
75 Minutes
Rye
4 cups
75 Minutes
Triticate
4 cups
75 Minutes
Oat Groats
4 cups
75 Minutes
Barley
4 cups
75 Minutes
Brown Rice
4 cups
65-75 Minutes
Wild Rice (1/2 lb.)
4 cups
75 Minutes
Millet
4 cups
40 Minutes
Quinoa
4 cups
30 Minutes
Amaranth
4 cups
30 Minutes
Kasha (Buckwheat Groats)
4 cups
15-20 Minutes

Cooking Whole Grains on the Stove Top

- Steaming Grains - - Stove Top Grains - - Pressure Cooking Grains - - Whole Grains - - Vegetarian - - Top -

Any of the whole grains can be cooked in a pot just as you would cook white rice, but they take longer and will use more liquid. Use a medium-size pot with a tight-fitting lid. Bring the liquid to a boil in the pot, stir in the grains and return to boiling. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pot and simmer until the grains are tender and most of the water is absorbed. Drain off any excess liquid. 
For 2 1/2 cups (1 pound) Grains
Amount of Bouillon or Water
Cooking Time
Wheat Berries
6 cups
60 Minutes
Kamut
6 cups
60 Minutes
Spelt
6 cups
60 Minutes
Rye
6 cups
60 Minutes
Triticate
6 cups
60 Minutes
Oat Groats
6 cups
60 Minutes
Barley
6 cups
60 Minutes
Brown Rice
5 cups
45 Minutes
Wild Rice (1/2 lb.)
6 cups
60 Minutes
Millet
5 cups
20 Minutes
Quinoa
5 cups
15 Minutes
Amaranth
5 cups
20 Minutes
Kasha (Buckwheat Groats)
6 cups
15 Minutes

Source: Good Food by Dr. Gabe and Diana Mirkin www.drmirkin.com  
Cooking Whole Grains http://www.drmirkin.com/goodfood/using_whole_grains2.html

Pressure Cooking Whole Grains and Rice

- Steaming Grains - - Stove Top Grains - - Pressure Cooking Grains - - Whole Grains - - Vegetarian - - Top -

Time Table:  Rice and Grain Cooking Times for Pressure Cookers

Grains (1 cup/250 ml) Approximate Water Quantity Approximate Cooking Time (minutes) Pressure Level
Barley, pearl 4 cups (950 ml) 15 to 20 High
Barley, pot 3 cups (750 ml) 20 High
Bulgur 3 cups (750 ml) 8 to 10 High
Couscous 2 cups (500 ml) 2 to 3 High
Kamut, whole 3 cups (750 ml) 10 to 12 High
Oats, quick cooking 1 2/3 cups (400 ml) 6 High
Oats, steel-cut 1 2/3 cups (400 ml) 11 High
Quinoa, quick cooking 2 cups (500 ml) 6 High
Rice, basmati 1 1/2 cups (350 ml) 5 to 7 High
Rice, brown 1 1/2 cups (350 ml) 12 to 15 High
Rice, white 1 1/2 cups (350 ml) 5 to 6 High
Rice, wild 3 cups (750 ml) 22 to 25 High
Spelt berries 3 cups (750 ml) 15 High
Wheat berries 3 cups (750 ml) 30 High

Rice and Grain Pressure-Cooking Instructions:

Use the natural release method when the cooking time is completed.

Before pressure-cooking, soak whole grain wheat berries and pearl barley in four times their volume of lukewarm water for at least four hours before cooking, or overnight.  Do not add salt to water since it will toughen the grains and inhibit hydration.


Do not soak rice or oats.

Rinse under lukewarm water (this also applies to rice).

Cook each 1 cup (250 ml) of grain in the amount of water specified.

Go to Part 1 "Whole Grains".

Go to Part 3 "Recipes for Whole Grains" includes links.

 

 

ewestgate
created September 22, 2009
last updated March 20, 2010