Go to Lee's Recipes  Texas! Quesadillas, Fajitas, Brisket , Chili and More

[Tex-Mex Cookbook Recipes] [Ethnic Recipes] [Mexican] [BBQ] [Beans] [Chipotles] [Guacamole] [Lee's Recipes]

Some Really Fine Texas Recipes

  1. Cynthia's Houston BBQ Brisket
  2. Fajitas
  3. Fajitas in Cilantro, Citrus, and Gold Tequila Marinade
  4. Mama's Sweet Potato Cobbler from Texas Eats by Robb Walsh
  5. Salsa Verde from The Foodlover's Atlas of the World by Martha Rose Shulman
  6. Jerk Chicken from The Foodlover's Atlas of the World by Martha Rose Shulman
  7. Serrano Ham Quesadillas Texas New Cuisine recipes from Nuevo Tex-Mex: Festive New Recipes from Just North of the Border (Chronicle Books) by David Garrido and Robb Walsh
  8. Corn Griddle Cakes Texas New Cuisine recipes from Nuevo Tex-Mex: Festive New Recipes from Just North of the Border (Chronicle Books) by David Garrido and Robb Walsh
  9. Chicken Fried Steak with Cracked Pepper Gravy Texas New Cuisine recipes from Nuevo Tex-Mex: Festive New Recipes from Just North of the Border (Chronicle Books) by David Garrido and Robb Walsh
  10. Cracked Pepper Gravy Texas New Cuisine recipes from Nuevo Tex-Mex: Festive New Recipes from Just North of the Border (Chronicle Books) by David Garrido and Robb Walsh
  11. Jimmy the B's Wildcat Barbecue Spice Rub
  12. Taco Pie from Betty Crocker
  13. Fajitas from Mexico from the Rio Grande Valley and Matamorous
  14. Fresh Flour Tortillas to accompany Fajitas from Mexico
  15. Fresh Homemade Tortillas easy and better than store-bought. Directions for making both types, corn and flour, includes images of the process and of the equipment.
  16. Beef Soft Tacos with Garlic Avocado Cream and Roasted Asparagus Salsa by Robin Miller
  17. Mesquite Smoked Chicken Tacos
  18. Mesquite-Smoked Salmon Fajitas
  19. Emeril's Smoked Texas Brisket
  20. Texas Beef Brisket Chili from Bruce Aidells
  21. Shredded Beef Salad with Chipotle Dressing
  22. Shredded-Beef Salad with with Lime and Avocado
  23. Chopped Beef Sandwiches with Spicy Barbecue Sauce from The Homesick Texan Cookbook
  24. Recipes from Garry Howard, Patricia Wriedt and other text sources over 100 Texas / Mexico recipes from the early days of the internet
  25. Texas "Caviar" Bean and Hominy Dip
  26. Frijoles Borrachos
  27. Frijoles Refritos from The Wide Wide World of Texas Cooking by Morton G. Clark
  28. Frijoles Rancheros
  29. Miso Chili Con Carne y Wasabi Sour Cream from Patricia Tanumihardja, author of The Asian Grandmothers Cookbook - Tex-Mex Asian style

Texas Quesadillas [Mexican] [Texas]

  1. Chicken Quesadillas w/Roasted Red Peppers and Spinach
  2. Mango Salsa
  3. Corn, Black Bean, Red Onion Quesadillas from Simple Vegetarian Pleasures by Jeanne Lemlin
  4. BBQ Quesadillas With Jay's Quick and Easy Barbecue Sauce
  5. Quesadillas With Onion and Poblano Chili Peppers from A Cook's Tour of Mexicoby Nancy Zaslavsky
  6. Potato Quesadillas from Quesadillas by Steven and Katherine Ramsland
  7. Beef, Blue Cheese, Spinach Quesadillas

Texas Recipes from The Tex-Mex Cookbook by Robb Walsh [TOC 107 recipes with ingredients] [Mexican] [Recipes Cookbooks] [Texas] [Lee's Recipes]

Intro Pages

  1. Introduction Page xvi
  2. Talking Tex Mex: Terms, Tools and Techniques Chapter One: Page 2

Recipe Pages 66/107

Tex-Mex Cookbook
  1. Molcajete Sauce Page 24
  2. Frijoles Page 25
  3. Mi Tierra's Frijoles Charros (Cowboy Beans) Page 26
  4. Frijoles Refritos Page 27
  5. Ox Eyes Page 28
  6. Amaya's Migas Page 30
  7. Cisco's Huevos Rancheros Page 30
  8. El Chico's Chorizo Page 31
  9. Homemade Flour Tortillas Page 34
  10. Corn Tortillas Page 35
  11. Berber Chili (Tangia) Page 48
  12. Carne con Chile Page 49
  13. Chile Puree Page 50
  14. Casa Rio Chili con Carne Page 51
  15. Chili Queen Enchiladas Page 58
  16. Sam Huttleston's Chili Page 59
  17. Truck Stop Chili Page 60
  18. Homemade Chili Powder Page 74
  19. Stewed Chicken Page 90
  20. Homemade Lard Page 90
  21. Mexican-style Tamales Page 91
  22. Salsa Verde Page 94
  23. Cornmeal Tamales Page 95
  24. Cornmeal Tamales in Chili Gravy Page 96
  25. Tamale Pie Page 97
  26. Old Borunda Stacked Red Chile Enchiladas Page 106
  27. Roasted Green Chiles Page 107
  28. Chile Macho (Green Chile Sauce) for enchiladas Page 110
  29. Stacked Green Chile and Chicken Enchiladas Page 111
  30. Dario's Chile Rellenos Page 126
  31. Tex-Mex Mole Page 127
  32. El Azteca's Chicken Mole Enchiladas Page 130
  33. Posole Page 131
  34. Tex-Mex Dry Rub Page 132
  35. Costillas (Beef Ribs) with Tex-Mex Dry Rub Page 132
  36. Carne Guisada Page 136
  37. Tortilla Soup Page 137
  38. Loma Linda Pralines Page 145
  39. Piloncillo Pecan Patties Page 147
  40. Pineapple Sherbet Page 147
  41. Mi Tierra Biscochitos Page 148
  42. Mexican Wedding Cookies Page 149
  43. Flan Page 150
  44. Homemade Dulce de Leche (Caramel) Page 151
  45. San Antonio Chocolate-Cajeta Flan Cake Page 151
  46. Larry's Cheese Enchiladas Page 162
  47. Los Tios Mexican Rice Page 163
  48. Josie's Plate (Chicken Enchilada with Friday Sauce) Page 164
  49. El Fenix Guacamole Salad Page 167
  50. El Chico's Salsa Fria (Pico de Gallo) Page 170
  51. Chili Mac Page 173
  52. Puffy Taco Shells Page 185
  53. Ground Beef Tacos Page 188
  54. El Fenix Original Tacos Page 189
  55. Brown's Nachos Page 199
  56. Salsa Picante Page 205
  57. Ninfa's Showcase Fajitas Page 218
  58. Ninfa's Green Sauce Page 219
  59. Ninfa's Red Sauce Page 219
  60. Steak Fajitas (Tacos al Carbon) Page 220
  61. Chicken Fajitas Page 221
  62. McAllen's Fajitas Page 222
  63. Smoked Tomato Salsa to serve with Fajitas Page 223
  64. Montparnasse Gruyere Enchiladas Page 253
  65. Fried Oyster Nachos Page 254
  66. Mango Salsa Page 254

Outside Links to more Tex-Mex Cookbook recipes

  1. http://www.tastebook.com/recipes/1792341-Molina-s-Hot-Relish Molina's Hot Relish (Escabeche) Page 172
  2. Chile Colorado con Puerco Page 113

Texas About Robb Walsh and Tex-Mex
[Recipes from The Tex-Mex Cookbook by Robb Walsh] [TOC 107 recipes with ingredients] [Mexican] [Recipes from Cookbooks] [Texas]

What is Tex-Mex?

According Robb Walsh, Tex-Mex an American regional cuisine. Although it has been influenced by Mexico, Tex-Mex is not Mexican. Unfortunately, especially outside of the Southwest and US Hispanic neighborhoods, there is a lot of very bad so-called Tex-Mex out there. Read Robb's New York Times article "A Celebration of Tex-Mex, Without Apology". See article copy or go directly to original at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/24/dining/24texm.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0 accessed 1/13/13.

Robb Walsh

Robb Walsh is a Texas food writer and restaurant for the Houston Press. In addition to recipes, Robb shares extensive research has done on the history of Tex-Mex food. According to Robb: "Each era has had its own quintessential Tex-Mex dish. Frijoles came first. Chile con carne became the defining dish of the late 1800s and spread across the country. Tamales became a famous Tex-Mex street food in the early 1900s. The "regular supper" as early combination plates were called were first served in the Anglo-owned Mexican restaurants like the Original in San Antonio and were popular through the 1960s. In West Texas, stacked enchiladas were and are the plato tipico. The invention of Velveeta brought about the American cheese enchilada which was the defining dish of mid-century Tex-Mex, and remains a favorite. Huevos rancheros with refrieds and fresh flour tortillas is a classic San Antonio dish too. Fajitas became the most popular Tex-Mex dish of the 1980s." Rob's blog at robbwalsh.com/
Robb is the author of several cookbooks:

  1. The Hot Sauce Cookbook: Turn Up the Heat with 60+ Pepper Sauce Recipes by Robb Walsh. 2013.
  2. Texas eats : the new lone star heritage cookbook, with more than 200 recipes by Robb Walsh. Berkeley, CA : Ten Speed Press, 2012 NEWTON LIBRARY.
  3. The Tex-Mex grill and backyard barbacoa cookbook by Robb Walsh. New York : Broadway Books, c2010. 1st ed. NEWTON LIBRARY
  4. The Texas cowboy cookbook by Robb Walsh. New York : Broadway Books, c2007. 1st ed. CONCORD LIBRARY
  5. The Tex-Mex cookbook : a history in recipes and photos by Robb Walsh. New York : Broadway Books, 2004. 1st ed. BELMONT LIBRARY
  6. Legends of Texas Barbecue Cookbook: Recipes and Recollections from the Pit Bosses by Robb Walsh. 2002.
  7. Nuevo Tex-Mex : festive new recipes from just north of the border by David Garrido and Robb Walsh ; foreword by Stephan Pyles ; photographs by Manny Rodriguez. San Francisco, Calif. : Chronicle Books, c1998. WATERTOWN LIBRARY
  8. A Cowboy in the Kitchen: Recipes from Reata and Texas West of the Pecos by Robb Walsh. 1998.

Texas Links to More Recipes from Robb Walsh
[Recipes from The Tex-Mex Cookbook by Robb Walsh] [TOC 107 recipes with ingredients] [Mexican] [Recipes from Cookbooks] [Texas]

  1. See Lee's recipes from Nuevo Tex-Mex — Festive New Recipes from Just North of the Border by David Garrido and Robb Walsh.
  2. Google Search recipes from The Tex-Mex Cookbook "Tex-Mex Cookbook" "recipename"
  3. See recipes by Robb Walsh on Cookstr at http://www.cookstr.com/searches/new?by=robb-walsh&page=1
  4. Browse Complete List 107 recipes. This page includes the ingredients for each recipe. From this page, return to here by clicking on the image of the cookbook. The source of this list is from EYB recipe list for Tex Mex Cooking.
  5. As of January 9, 2013, 48 (out of the 107 recipes) have been added. To add new recipes to the collection, open TEMPLATEtexmex.txt and copy source into a txt document. Customize as needed and name appropriately followed by ext html. To see layout of the template page, view Tex MexTemplate.
  6. See links to Robb Walsh's list of 100 favorite Houston dishes.
  7. See Robb Walsh's recipes at Cook the Book site. outside link with recipes from many different cookbooks by Robb

Texas More Books about Texas Cooking [Mexican] [Texas]

Lee owns two books about Texas cooking:

Texas Home Cooking by Cheryl Alters Jamison

Taste of Texas by Joy Moffett Angel
Texas Home Cooking by Cheryl Alters Jamison has more than 400 recipes from every region and subculture of their home state. A section on Texas classics includes recipes for "real" barbeque, lots of chili, Tex-Mex favorites, and chicken-fried steak and other cowboy fare; "Lone Star Specialties" covers breakfasts, desserts, and Super Bowl menus; and in between are lots of meat dishes, relishes and condiments, and side dishes

See Lisa Fain's List at her Amazon book store

For recipes, lists of books and interesting anecdotes about Texas Homesick Texan by Lisa Fain, author of The Homesick Texan Cookbook

Texas  Cynthia's Brisket Houston Style in Oven  |

Cynthia Pinson, Rhode Islander transplanted to Houston taught me this fast, yummy brisket which feeds a crowd.
You do not have to be born in Texas to cook up fabulous Texas cuisine.

Cynthia Pinson, transplanted Rhode Islander to Houston200° overnight approx. 12 hours

10 lb. lean brisket trimmed of fat (or a smaller brisket is fine, just cook less time)
soy sauce
barbecue sauce

Prick holes in brisket with a fork. Put in a shallow baking pan. Cover with a bottle of soy sauce and a bottle of barbecue sauce. Cover with foil and bake for 12 hours at 200°.

Texas  Chicken Quesadillas With Roasted Red Peppers and Spinach  |

Makes 4 quesadillas; 4 to 6 servings

We've taken a grilled version of this peppery chicken and moved it indoors. The roasted red peppers and blanched spinach add both flavor and flair. For even more of both, serve with mango salsa that has been laced with cardamom and jalapeño chili pepper.

4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 4 ounces each)
2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 to 3 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
12 ounces fresh spinach (about
4 1/2 cups), firm stems removed
Eight 8- to 10-inch flour tortillas
3 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese (about 12 ounces)
2 cups chopped roasted red bell peppers (2 to 3 peppers),* stemmed, seeded and diced
1/2 cup chopped scallions, white and tender green parts
1 cup Mango Salsa (recipe follows)

Brush both sides of each chicken breast half with the oil and coat with the pepper, patting lightly so it sticks. Place a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the chicken and cook for about 5 minutes per side or until golden. Set aside to cool before shredding into bite-size pieces.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil, add the spinach and blanch it for 1 1/2 minutes. Drain through a colander and rinse with cold water. Using your hands, squeeze as much moisture out of it as you can. Chop coarsely and set aside.

Place 4 of the tortillas on a work surface. Using half of the cheese, scatter it evenly on each of the tortillas. Layer the shredded chicken on the cheese, followed by the roasted red bell peppers, spinach and scallions. Top with the remaining cheese. Place a tortilla on each one and press down lightly.

In a large pan, griddle or grill pan over medium heat, cook each quesadilla for 2 to 3 minutes per side or until it lightly browns and the cheese melts. Transfer to a work surface and cut into 6 to 8 wedges. Serve with Mango Salsa.

*NOTE: To roast a bell pepper, place it on a piece of aluminum foil positioned about 4 inches from the broiler element. Turn every few minutes until the skin is charred on all sides. Place the charred pepper in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let it sit for 15 minutes. Remove the charred skin; it will slip right off.

Per serving (based on 6): 486 calories, 37 g protein, 25 g carbohydrates, 26 g fat, 94 mg cholesterol, 13 g saturated fat, 693 mg sodium, 7 g dietary fiber

Texas  Mango Salsa  |

Makes 1 cup

1 large mango, peeled, seeded and diced
1 jalapeno chili pepper, roasted,* peeled, seeds and stem removed, and minced
Juice from 1 lime (about 2 tablespoons)
1 tablespoon minced cilantro
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Crushed cardamom seeds

In a medium bowl, gently toss the mango, jalapeño chili pepper, lime juice, cilantro and oil. Add a pinch each of the salt, pepper and cardamom and stir to combine.

*NOTE: To roast a jalapeño chili pepper, follow same procedures as for a bell pepper (see previous recipe).

Per-tablespoon serving: 17 calories, 0 g protein, 2 g carbohydrates, 1 g fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 0 g saturated fat, 15 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber

Recipes tested by Michael Taylor; e-mail questions to food@washpost.com

Texas  Corn, Black Bean and Red Onion Quesadillas  |

Makes 4 quesadillas; 4 to 6 servings

Here, the vegetables provide a crunchy contrast to the creamy melted cheese, with a little kick from the chili powder. The quesadillas can be made on the stovetop or, especially if you're increasing the recipe, in the oven. Serve with salsa, sour cream or guacamole.

Adapted from "Simple Vegetarian Pleasures," by Jeanne Lemlin (Harper Collins, 1998).

Eight 8-inch flour tortillas
1 cup frozen corn, thawed
1 cup freshly cooked or canned black beans, rinsed and well drained if canned (may substitute kidney beans)
2/3 cup paper-thin slivers of red onion
2 cups grated Monterey Jack cheese (about 8 ounces)
1 teaspoon chili powder

Place 4 of the tortillas on a work surface. Sprinkle one-quarter of the corn, beans, onion, cheese and chili powder evenly on each tortilla, leaving a 1/2 -inch border. Top with the remaining tortillas and press down to help them stick together.

To cook them on the stovetop: Heat a large, ungreased skillet or grill pan over medium heat. (If the tortillas are more dry than fresh and moist, lightly coat the skillet with nonstick spray oil.) Add 1 quesadilla and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, then flip over and cook another 4 to 5 minutes. It's done when it begins to get brown flecks and the cheese is melted.

To bake: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Place the quesadillas on a large, ungreased, rimmed baking sheet (use nonstick spray oil if the tortillas are on the dry side) and bake for 5 minutes per side.

Transfer the quesadillas to a cutting board and cut each into 4 wedges. Let them rest for 1 to 2 minutes before serving.

Per serving (based on 6): 346 calories, 16 g protein, 37 g carbohydrates, 15 g fat, 34 mg cholesterol, 8 g saturated fat, 540 mg sodium, 5 g dietary fiber

Recipe tested by Belle Elving; e-mail questions to food@washpost.com

Texas  BBQ Quesadillas With Jay's Quick and Easy Barbecue Sauce  |

Makes four folded-over quesadillas

This takes less time if a store-bought, chipotle-flavored barbecue sauce and prepared garnishes are used, but these recipes will add layers of flavor. If you make the sauce, you'll have enough to make another batch of steak. Recipes adapted from "Cocina," by Leland Atkinson (Ten Speed Press, 1996).

For the barbecue sauce:

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cups thinly sliced onions
1 1/2 cups cider vinegar
2 dried ancho chili peppers and 6 dried chipotle peppers, broken into pieces, with seeds removed
10 large cloves roasted garlic* (may substitute 4 teaspoons prepared roasted garlic)
1 cup molasses
2 1/2 cups ketchup
Salt
About 1/2 cup water

For the quesadillas:

1 1/2 pounds top sirloin steak
2 tablespoons Barbecue Spice Rub (recipe follows) or salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 cup barbecue sauce
Four 10-inch flour tortillas
2 1/2 cups grated Monterey Jack cheese (about 10 ounces)
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, at room temperature

For the garnishes (optional):

1/2 cup crema (recipe follows)
1 cup salsa fresca (recipe follows)
1/4 cup chopped scallions, green parts only
4 sprigs cilantro

To make the barbecue sauce:

In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat the oil. Add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until they are browned and soft, about 5 minutes. Add the vinegar, and when it is warmed through, add the dried chili and chipotle peppers, roasted garlic, molasses and ketchup, stirring to combine. Add salt to taste and some or all of the water to adjust the consistency. Cook for 8 minutes and then remove from the heat.

Puree the sauce in batches in a blender or food processor until smooth. (Strain the sauce through a fine-mesh strainer, if desired.) Set aside, or cover tightly and refrigerate for up to 8 days.

For the quesadillas:

  1. Rub the meat with the barbecue spice rub or salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.
  2. Heat a grill pan over medium-high heat or prepare an outdoor grill for medium-high direct heat. Grill the meat for at least 10 to 12 minutes total, turning to sear it on both sides. Transfer the meat to a cutting board and let it rest for 5 minutes, then slice thinly across the grain.
  3. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan over low heat, warm 1 cup of the barbecue sauce. Add the sliced meat and cook for about 8 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

To assemble:

  1. Preheat the oven to 250 degrees. Wrap the stack of tortillas with aluminum foil and place in the oven for 5 to 10 minutes to make them pliable.
  2. Spread 5 tablespoons of the cheese over half of each tortilla, leaving a 1/2 -inch border. Place one-quarter of the barbecue-sauced meat over the cheese, then top with another 5 tablespoons of the cheese. Fold each tortilla over and press gently. Brush the tops with half of the softened butter.
  3. On a dry griddle or large pan over medium heat, cook the quesadillas in batches for 2 to 3 minutes on each side until they are browned and crisp on the edges, using the remaining butter as needed. (Finished quesadillas may be kept warm by placing them on a baking sheet in a 250-degree oven.)

For the garnishes:
To make a cup of simple crema, add 2 tablespoons of buttermilk to 1 cup of sour cream, stirring well to combine. For 1 cup of salsa fresca, in a medium bowl, combine 1/4 of a red onion, diced; 4 Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced; 1 to 2 jalapeño chili peppers, stemmed, seeded and diced; 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped cilantro; 1 teaspoon salt; a pinch of sugar; 1 tablespoon lime juice; 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil and 2 tablespoons Mexican or dark beer. Stir gently and allow to stand at room temperature for 30 minutes before serving. Cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Cut each quesadilla into 6 to 8 wedges and divide among warmed plates, serve with a streak of the crema, the salsa fresca, chopped scallions and cilantro as garnishes, if desired. Serve hot.

*NOTE: T o roast garlic, slice the top off of 1 head of garlic so that the tops of the cloves inside are exposed. Lightly drizzle with olive oil and wrap tightly in aluminum foil. Bake in a preheated 425-degree oven for about 45 minutes or until the garlic has softened and browned. Set aside until cool enough to handle, then squeeze the softened garlic cloves out of their skins and discard the stem end.

Per serving: 757 calories, 72 g protein, 29 g carbohydrates, 37 g fat, 170 mg cholesterol, 20 g saturated fat 37 g, 1,304 mg sodium, 1 g dietary fiber

Texas  Jimmy the B's Wildcat Barbecue Spice Rub  |

Makes about 1/4 cup

This rub tastes better than store-bought brands we've tried. The recipe was created in the kitchens of Washington's Red Sage restaurant.

3/4 teaspoon cumin seeds, toasted*
1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds, toasted*
2 1/2 pieces dried chipotle chili peppers, toasted*, broken into pieces, seeds removed
2 teaspoons diced sun-dried tomatoes, not packed in oil (optional)
2 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon powdered mustard
1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns

Place all the ingredients in a food processor or spice grinder and pulse until the spices are well blended. (Remove the large pieces of sun-dried tomatoes, if using.) Store in an airtight container for up to 3 weeks.

*NOTE: To toast the cumin and coriander seeds, place a small skillet over medium heat. Add the seeds (do this in separate batches) and toast, shaking the pan occasionally, until the spices are fragrant, 2 to 4 minutes. Transfer to a heatproof bowl and cool completely. To toast the dried chili peppers, place them in a dry skillet over moderate heat for 1 to 2 minutes, watching carefully so they don't burn.

Per-1.5 teaspoon serving: 13 calories, 0 g protein, 3 g carbohydrates, 0 g fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 0 g saturated fat, 298 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber

Recipes tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; e-mail questions to food@washpost.com

Texas  Quesadillas With Onion and Poblano Chili Peppers  |

Makes 4 folded-over appetizer-size quesadillas

The sauteed onion and chili peppers lend some punch, but if you prefer quesadillas with just plain cheese, they'll still taste good. Quesillo de Oaxaca, available at Latino specialty stores, is the most tangy, but mozzarella, string cheese or Monterey Jack are good substitutes. Serve with a spicy salsa, either fresh or cooked.

Adapted from "A Cook's Tour of Mexico," by Nancy Zaslavsky (St. Martin's Press, 1995).

2 tablespoons vegetable oil, or more as needed
1 small white onion, chopped
2 poblano chili peppers, roasted,* peeled, seeds and stem removed, and cut into thin strips
4 corn tortillas
1 cup quesillo de Oaxaca, mozzarella cheese, string cheese or Monterey Jack cheese

In a large skillet over medium heat, heat the oil. Add the onion and chili peppers and cook 1 to 2 minutes, or until lightly brown. Transfer to a small bowl.

There should be oil remaining in the skillet. If not, add 1 tablespoon and heat. Add 1 tortilla, cook 30 seconds, then, using tongs, turn it over. Place one-quarter of the onion-chili pepper mixture on half of the tortilla and top it with one-quarter of the cheese. Fold the empty half over the filled half, using the tongs to press down and spread the filling and press the edges closed. Move the quesadilla to the side of the skillet and continue with the remaining three tortillas, overlapping the folded quesadillas if necessary. Cook on both sides, about 1 minute total. The quesadillas should be golden and a little crisp. Transfer quesadillas to a cutting board and cut each one into thirds. Serve immediately.

*NOTE: To roast a chili pepper, place it on a piece of aluminum foil positioned about 4 inches from the broiler element. Turn every few minutes until the skin is charred on all sides. Place the chili pepper in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let it sit for 15 minutes. Remove the charred skin; it will slip right off.

Per serving: 209 calories, 9 g protein, 18 g carbohydrates, 12 g fat, 18 mg cholesterol, 4 g saturated fat, 188 mg sodium, 2 g dietary fiber

Recipe tested by Marcia Kramer; e-mail questions to food@washpost.com

Texas  Potato Quesadillas  |

Makes 4 quesadillas

Street vendors in Mexico City can't make enough of these. This version not only replaces the cheese with potato but also uses fat-free tortillas and fat-free chicken broth. Save leftovers for breakfast.

For the quesadillas:

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 small white onion, thinly sliced
1 large russet potato, peeled and cut into 1/4 -inch cubes
1 cup fat-free, reduced-sodium chicken broth
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Eight 8-inch fat-free tortillas

For the garnishes (optional):

1 cup low-fat sour cream
1 tomato, seeded and chopped
2 fresh or pickled jalapeño chili peppers, thinly sliced
1 small white onion, thinly sliced

For the quesadillas:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Coat 2 nonstick rimmed baking sheets with nonstick spray oil.
In a medium nonstick skillet over medium heat, heat the oil. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, for about 6 minutes or until golden brown. Add the potato and cook for 1 minute. Stir in the stock or broth and cook for 8 to 12 minutes, or until the potatoes are soft and the liquid has been absorbed. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Arrange 4 of the tortillas on the baking sheets. Divide the potato mixture among the tortillas and spread evenly. Top each with 1 of the remaining tortillas. Lightly coat the tops with nonstick spray oil. Bake for 5 minutes, turn over and bake another 5 minutes, or until lightly browned and heated through. Cut each quesadilla into 8 wedges.

For the garnishes:

Arrange the sour cream, tomato, jalapeño chili peppers and onion in separate serving bowls, if using. Serve with the quesadillas and pass at the table.

Per serving (based on 4): 286 calories, 11 g protein, 63 g carbohydrates, 4 g fat, 6 mg cholesterol, 1 g saturated fat, 631 mg sodium, 17 g dietary fiber

Recipe tested by Marcia Kramer; e-mail questions to food@washpost.com

washingtonpost.com Washington Post Wednesday, January 11, 2006; Page F02
Recipes adapted from "Quesadillas," by Steven and Katherine Ramsland (Prima, 1997).

Texas  Frijoles Borrachos  | Beans

Serves: 6 or more

The word borracho was a 19th century term for a drunkard, so this recipe's name literally means "drunken pinto beans." Simmering the pintos in beer, with lots of cilantro, results in a very special flavor.

1 tablespoon canola oil
1 cup chopped ripe tomatoes or 1 cup canned diced tomatoes
2 large scallions, chopped
4 cups cooked pinto beans
l/2 cup beer
1/3 cup chopped
fresh cilantro
1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and minced, or one 4-ounce can chopped mild green chilies
Salt to taste

Heat the oil in a large skillet. Add the tomatoes and scallions and saute over moderately low heat for 2 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients and stir together,then simmer, covered, over low heat for 30 minutes. If there's too much liquid in the skillet at this time, cook, uncovered, until it thickens up a bit. Serve hot, with warm tortillas.

 

Texas  Frijoles Refritos  | Beans

1 batch Frijoles
lard or bacon drippings

Cook pinto beans as described in the Frijoles Borrachos recipe, or use leftovers.

For 2 cups of cooked beans, heat 6 tablespoons of lard or bacon drippings in a heavy iron skillet over moderate heat. Add the beans. As they fry, mash them with the back of a wooden spoon. Continue to fry and mash them until they are dry enough to shake loose from the bottom of the pan in a mass. The inner portion of this mass will (or should) be moist. The bottom surface will be slightly crusty. The consistency is not necessarily smooth like a purée, though it may be.

Recipe from The Wide, Wide World of Texas Cooking by Morton G. Clark
see sample list of recipes

Texas  Frijoles Rancheros  | Beans

2 cups dried pinto beans
water
1 cup diced bacon or salt pork or meaty ham bone
1 medium onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 T. chili powder
1 tsp. ground cumin
1 tsp. salt
1 fresh tomato, chopped
12 oz can beer
1 (4 oz) can chopped green chiles, drained
1 or 2 jalapeño peppers, stemmed, seeded and chopped (optional)

Wash beans well. Combine beans, beer, and water to cover beans by 2". Soak overnight.

http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/hot_and_spicy_cuising/21315

Updated December 30, 2012